Our Authors




Sarah Birdsall
Ann Chandonnet
Neil Davis
Kris Farmen
John Foley
Eric Forrer
Susan Hudson Johnson
Tim Jones
George William Kelly
Patricia Monaghan
Nita Nettleton
Don G. Porter
Slim Randles
C.M. Winterhouse



Sarah Birdsall
Sarah Birdsall

Author of The Red Mitten

Award winning author Sarah Birdsall has lived in Alaska since 1968, spending many of her formative years in remote areas of the state. She has a BA in journalism and an MFA in creative writing, and works as a journalist in her home town of Talkeetna, Alaska.








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Ann Chandonnet
Ann Chandonnet

Author of The Birthday Party

As a child, Ann Chandonnet went about muttering phrases like "beautiful pea green boat" and "Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail, and Peter." This affected her mind permanently, and she became a writer. She was a feature writer for The Anchorage Times for ten years, and has also written for the Anchorage Daily News, Alaska magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, and Early American Life. Her most recent newspaper work was for the Juneau Empire, where she was a feature writer and for three years covered the police and court beat.

Ann Chandonnet's latest book is "Write Quick": War and a Woman's Life in Letters, 1835-1867, based on genealogical research by her co-editor, Roberta Pevear. The book is based on 150 letters from ancestors of Pevear and Chandonnet, who are third cousins. "Write Quick" was published April 20, 2010 by Winoca Books of Wilmington, N.C. For a review of the book in the September 2010 Civil War News, click here

Ann also writes poetry and cookbooks, including The Alaska Heritage Seafood Cookbook and Gold Rush Grub (which was selected by the American Association of School Librarians as an Outstanding Book for 2006), a commentary and collection of authentic historical recipes, from the University of Alaska Press. She is also the author of Alaska's Arts, Crafts & Collectibles, which is in its second printing. Chandonnet's previous book for children is Chief Stephen's Parky, historical fiction set in the Athabascan village of Knik, Alaska, in 1898.

You can email her at: chandonnetvale@wildblue.net

It seems that other publishers aren't perfect either....

"Due to difficulties (like, bankruptcy and not sending out review copies or filling orders!) with the original publisher of my history *"Write Quick,"* based on ancestors' letters, my editing partner Roberta Pevear and I have found a new publisher: Bethel Historical Society (Bethel, Maine).

The book will be available in soft cover only, and the price has been reduced from $40 to $35.95. I have some hard covers (still $60), should anyone want one. Yes, I am available for lectures/signings. I did one recently in Morganton, N.C., and am planning another in Winston-Salem in August."

--Ann Chandonnet


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Neil Davis

Author of Battling Against Success, The Great Alaska Zingwater Caper, and Caught in the Sluice

Long-time Alaskan Neil Davis is known for his scientific career as a geophysicist with NASA and the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. His nonfiction writings include not just the eighty-some technical papers he has written or coauthored but also more popularly accessible books on matters scientific and historic, the first of which began in 1976 as a regular newspaper column illuminating aspects of science for the general public. Collected, Dr. Davis's columns became Alaska Science Nuggets. Other titles include Energy/Alaska, The Aurora Watcher's Handbook, and The College Hill Chronicles, a history of the University of Alaska in its early days, all available from the University of Alaska Press. Now Davis writes fiction as well, drawing on his experiences growing up in Alaska, including his family-based interest in gold mining and appreciation for the role miners have played in Alaska. His fictional works to date are The Great Alaska Zingwater Caper, Battling Against Success and Caught in the Sluice.

Davis and his wife, the potter Rosemarie Davis, built their own log home near Fairbanks, where they live full-time. Their three children also live in Alaska with their families.

You can learn more about Neil Davis at his website, http://www.neildavisalaska.com


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Kris Farmen
Kris Farmen

Author of The Devil's Share

Kris Farmen was born in Alaska and grew up both in a house in Anchorage and in various wall tents and plywood shacks in the Bush. He has lived in Fairbanks, McCarthy, Ninilchik, and Homer, as well as overseas in Australia. His writing has appeared in The Surfer's Path, Mushing magazine, The Ester Republic, and the Anchorage Press. He still lives in Alaska, with no fixed address.

Kris's photo is courtesy of Scott Dickerson Photography, www.ScottDickerson.com




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John Foley

Author of Lost Frontier

Author John Foley researched Lost Frontier at Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve, which accounts for the accurate depiction of the arctic wilderness. A former newspaper reporter in Alaska and Chicago, Foley is now a high-school English teacher in Arizona. He has written other short stories and novels, including Hoops of Steel, which was named a Book for the Teen Age in 2008.



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Eric Forrer
Eric Forrer

Author of Bucket

Eric Forrer's parents spent eighteen years teaching for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and as a consequence of their employment at remote sites, he received his primary and secondary education by correspondence. He has had a varied career in boat-building, ocean freight, commercial fishing, construction, and contracting. Doubleday published his first and only novel, From the Nets of a Salmon Fisherman, in 1973. He was appointed to the University of Alaska Board of Regents in 1989 but managed to escape with his skin intact after a full and interesting term. Forrer, his wife Sally (for whom Bucket was written), and his son Leif live in Juneau, Alaska.

You can contact Eric at eforrer@gci.net


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Susan Hudson Johnson

Author of Alaskans Die Young

Long-time Alaska resident Susan Hudson Johnson was born in New York City and grew up in New Jersey. She brought degrees from Douglass College and Rutgers University with her when she came north, and put them to good use in Fairbanks, where she taught music in the public schools for twenty years. Since retirement, she has found more time for writing, and is now hard at work on further adventures of Heather Adams and a children's book featuring Heather's grandson Andrew.


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Tim Jones

Author of Keep the Round Side Down

Tim Jones abandoned a career in journalism in Anchorage to operate boats in Alaska's Prince William Sound professionally and for pleasure, where he lived for more than 20 years. He is well known for his nonfiction (The Last Great Race, Wild Critters, and Dog Heroes are some of his titles) and currently lives lives in southcentral Alaska, no longer on the ocean--for now.


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George William Kelly
George William Kelly

Author of Santa Christina and Her Sled Dogs

George William Kelly was born in Evergreen, Alabama. He has worked as a journalist for several U.S. newspapers, the Associated Press, and various trade journals, as well as doing freelance reporting in India. He served as public relations director for the Brooklyn Children's Museum and co-founded the Go Fly a Kite store in Manhattan. He served as an airman for ten winter months at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, Alaska, at the end of World War II. He and his wife, Jain, live in New York City. Their little girl, Georgette, grew up and now lives in Chicago. George is the author of one other illustrated children's book, What Does the Tooth Fairy Do with All Those Teeth?, and a collection of short stories, Georgette's Apple Bivortex Theory of Everything.


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Patricia Monaghan
Patricia Monaghan

Author of Alaska by Heart: Recipes for Independence

Visionary poet Patricia Monaghan celebrates the mythic in the ordinary, the spiritual in the mundane, the sensuous in the scientific. An impassioned teacher and performer, she has won awards for creative nonfiction as well as poetry. Her highly crafted work remains accessible to ordinary readers interested in spirituality, peace, and environmental issues. Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at DePaul University, Patricia is also Senior Fellow of The Black Earth Institute, a think-tank for artists seeking to connect social justice, environment and spirituality.

Patricia was raised in Alaska and lived there for many years. She earned her BA and MA in English from the University of Minnesota, her MFA in creative writing from the University of Alaska, and her PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies (science and literature) from the Union Institute in Cincinnati.

For more about Patricia Monaghan, see her website at http://www.patricia-monaghan.com/


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Nita Nettleton
Nita Nettleton

Author of Wake Up Call of the Wild and Accessories are Everything in the Wild

You can take the girl out of Alaska, but...

Nita finds the rest of the world interesting, but says, "Give me April in Skagway." She grew up in Anchorage, "raised by dogs in southcentral Alaska who shared berry patches and made sure I paid attention outdoors," and lived in Denali, Talkeetna, Big Lake, Skagway, and Juneau. She's worked in tourism, slung hash, weighed trucks, and spent the last decade working as a fed before blowing the Alaska pop stand for a retiring life with her retired husband in Belize. Currently, she is exploring points south to see what the birds were talking about.

You can contact Nita Nettleton at mooselegs@alaska.net


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Don G. Porter
Don G. Porter

Author of Happy Hour, Yukon Murders, and Humpy Cove

Don G. Porter knows his Alaska, from the bar scene of forty years' back to the ins and outs of piloting small planes over empty northern territory.

You can learn more about Don Porter at his website, http://www.dongporter.com/





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Slim Randles
Slim Randles

Author of Raven's Prey and The Long Dark

Slim Randles considers himself an outdoorsman first and a writer second. His career spans more than three decades as a journalist, but is heavily dosed with life in the outdoors.

He began his career as a cowboy and mule packer in the California High Sierra, then spent a decade in Alaska as a "resident adventurer," as he puts it, for the Anchorage Daily News. While writing columns for the paper, he built a cabin twelve miles from the nearest road and lived in it for eight years, drove a team in the first (1973) Iditarod sled dog race, and spent eight seasons as an assistant hunting guide in the Alaska Range and the Talkeetna Mountains, working primarily for the late Clark Engle and several other fair-chase guides.

Randles has also been associate editor of Petersen's Hunting Magazine, author of hundreds of outdoor magazine articles, adjunct professor of journalism at the University of New Mexico, and a columnist for the Albuquerque Journal and New Mexico magazine. One of his short stories appeared in the Western collection Hot Biscuits, and the University of New Mexico Press recently (2005) published his biography of a famous Western author, Ol' Max Evans: The First Thousand Years, which received special notice from Publishers Weekly. His syndicated columns now appear in small newspapers all over the U.S.

You can learn more about Slim Randles at his website, http://www.slimrandles.com/


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C.M Winterhouse
C.M. Winterhouse

Author of Cut Bait

C.M. Winterhouse has previously published short stories, most recently in the monthly Ester Republic. She is a forty-year resident of Alaska who now lives in the Interior near Fairbanks, but would like to spend more time off Alaska's spectacular coast, messing about in boats.










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